Author Topic: Radiator Water Pan  (Read 10279 times)

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Offline Nazerac

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Radiator Water Pan
« on: November 16, 2008, 01:09:19 PM »
Do any of you still have your radiator water pan?  Do you use it? Does it work?  Are they worth cleaning them up?  Marty, what do you think? 

Offline Bear

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Re: Radiator Water Pan
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2008, 03:04:48 PM »
Still have a couple, pitched a few because they were leaking.
Mine were all galvanized, and custom made for each radiator
from what I could tell. These all fit through the center of the
radiator, running the entire width with a fill receptacle on one
end.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2008, 03:07:14 PM by Bear »
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Offline watcher

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Re: Radiator Water Pan
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2008, 03:08:43 PM »
Do any of you still have your radiator water pan?  Do you use it? Does it work?  Are they worth cleaning them up?  Marty, what do you think? 

Every little bit helps. Cleaning the old galvanized ones can be a PITA, but the added humidity is welcome.
"Atlas Shrugged": A Thousand Pages of Bad Science Fiction About Sock-Puppets Stabbing Strawmen with Tax Cuts. -Driftglass

Jo

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Re: Radiator Water Pan
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2008, 04:41:48 PM »
What exactly is a radiator pan? I mean, I can guess based on the name, but I don't think I've ever seen one...

Offline watcher

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Re: Radiator Water Pan
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2008, 06:13:01 PM »
What exactly is a radiator pan? I mean, I can guess based on the name, but I don't think I've ever seen one...

Most, typically, they are hidden in radiator covers/enclosures and are simple rectangular pans that sit above the top of the radiator.
Another style consists of a metal/plastic trough that slides into the side slots with a reservoir that protrudes from the side.
A third type slides behind the radiator and is held in place by hooks that loop over the center.

All use the heat of the radiator to evaporate water into the air.
"Atlas Shrugged": A Thousand Pages of Bad Science Fiction About Sock-Puppets Stabbing Strawmen with Tax Cuts. -Driftglass

Offline watcher

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Re: Radiator Water Pan
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2008, 06:25:54 PM »
here are three add on styles for those who don't have enclosures...

http://www.tullulastreasures.citymax.com/page/page/752171.htm

http://www.kilianhardware.com/radhum.html

http://www.homeandbeyond.com/prod-8554200209.html

With a little ingenuity you can fashion an effective alternative from an old coat hanger
and a tapered cylinder (a glass?). With the added benefit of being able to put the container in
the dishwasher as needed.
"Atlas Shrugged": A Thousand Pages of Bad Science Fiction About Sock-Puppets Stabbing Strawmen with Tax Cuts. -Driftglass

Offline Bonster

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Re: Radiator Water Pan
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2008, 07:02:57 PM »
What exactly is radiator porn?
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Jo

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Re: Radiator Water Pan
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2008, 07:19:38 PM »
What exactly is a radiator pan? I mean, I can guess based on the name, but I don't think I've ever seen one...

Most, typically, they are hidden in radiator covers/enclosures and are simple rectangular pans that sit above the top of the radiator.
Another style consists of a metal/plastic trough that slides into the side slots with a reservoir that protrudes from the side.
A third type slides behind the radiator and is held in place by hooks that loop over the center.

All use the heat of the radiator to evaporate water into the air.

Well I'm glad I asked, because that's not at all what I would have guessed. I've lived for many years with radiators and have never seen any of those that you described or posted. Thanks so much for the info.  :)

Offline watcher

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Re: Radiator Water Pan
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2008, 08:20:37 PM »
What exactly is radiator porn?

If you have to ask, you're not the Bonster.
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Offline chandasz

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Re: Radiator Water Pan
« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2008, 02:36:56 PM »
We have them in our living room and dining rooms and use them regularly

Offline maraire

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Re: Radiator Water Pan
« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2008, 01:31:01 AM »
Do any of you still have your radiator water pan?  Do you use it? Does it work?  Are they worth cleaning them up?  Marty, what do you think? 

You need humidity in the winter and rad pans have been used for many years. The down side is the maintenance. They have to be filled regularly and they do deteriorate. There are whole house humidifier that are designed to be used in water heated homes. Barely no maintenance and work really well. Try aprilaire.com for info.

Offline Terri

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Re: Radiator Water Pan
« Reply #11 on: November 25, 2008, 10:05:18 AM »
A few more options:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/27/garden/27room.html?_r=2

The snowjoe model should be available at Ace on Ogden, about $7.00.

http://snowjoe.com/products.asp?product_id=100007&dept_id=&parent_id=

Offline watcher

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Re: Radiator Water Pan
« Reply #12 on: November 25, 2008, 11:21:22 AM »
So I couldn't stop myself. About ten feet of copper wire and a set of twelve aluminum "tumblers" that have been gathering dust have
been put to functional use. Wrap the wire around the tumbler about an inch from the top, twist the wire to form a loop of proper size. (the tumblers are tapered, like a Pint glass?) loop the wire under the center rad. section (adjusting for length) wrap and twist the wire end around the run and lower into position.

I used four on the 6' Living Room radiator, three in the kitchen, one in the front hall and two each in the dining room.
Twelve 16 oz. tumblers were filled on Sunday. Today they were 3/4 empty. That's over a gallon of water that wasn't in the air before.
I still have the 5 gallon humidifier, with humidistat, filled and running, but it has shut off intermittently which it hadn't before.

Due to the set back thermostat, the heat in usually only on about 4 hrs. a day. If your radiators stay hot longer, you would get even more moisture.
(But you'd have to refill more often too.)

Just about any metal, glass or ceramic container of the right size/shape could be fitted in the same way. If you "use" your radiators or if it is in a high traffic area,
you could devise something slimmer? You could even use urn shaped glass vases too for more storage volume. Just use a heavier gauge wire.

My wife is thrilled with the red/green/gold/silver cups in the living room. Very Christmassy.

"Atlas Shrugged": A Thousand Pages of Bad Science Fiction About Sock-Puppets Stabbing Strawmen with Tax Cuts. -Driftglass